Ground Pork Ramen

By 6 m read
Ground Pork Ramen (Photo by Erich Boenzli)
(Photo by Erich Boenzli)

We live in a town of 900 people and no Asian take-out restaurant. That doesn’t mean we don’t get that sudden craving for Chinese take-out food that has to be satisfied or else. Today’s craving is ground pork ramen. 

 

So, ordering out is not an option. No problem. Over the years, I’ve come up with a whole series of quick, tasty “Asian take-out meals” to satisfy this craving, and today I’d like to share one of my favorites. It’s so simple and adaptable to whatever you have in the fridge to spruce it up. 

 

I’m not claiming that this is an authentic pork mince Chinese recipe, or even close to the real thing for that matter. I’m claiming that with this easy ground pork ramen recipe, I can satisfy my pork and noodles craving without picking up the phone. 

 

This super simple recipe is also highly adaptable to your taste. Using my instructions and the ingredients below will result in a savory, sweet, velvety, and spicy (to whatever heat level you prefer) dish that will make you wish you’d made more, to have some leftovers for tomorrow.

Ground Pork Ramen (Photo by Erich Boenzli)
(Photo by Erich Boenzli)

Ground Pork and Ramen Recipe

I always have packs of ramen noodles in the pantry. They’re so versatile and certainly last a long time. Even if you decide to go off on one of these “health food trips,” they will still be there in your pantry, patiently waiting for you. Yes, I know they’re deep fried, but so are a lot of tasty things (think of all the delicious food at the annual fairground events). Hey, ground pork is pretty good for you they say…….

 

Easy Pork Noodles (Ramen) in 20 Minutes

While you’re chopping your veggies and collecting the other ingredients, cook ramen noodles (without using the seasoning packet). Before you drain them, scoop out about half a cup of the water and set aside. This liquid will become part of the sauce. Drain the noodles and rinse in cold water, so they’ll stop cooking. Cooked ramen should be springy and not spongy. You ramen lovers out there now exactly what I mean by that. 

Ground Pork Ramen (Photo by Erich Boenzli)
(Photo by Erich Boenzli)

Heat a tablespoon of vegetable oil over high heat in a sauté pan and brown the ground pork. Use a wooden spoon to break apart any clumps. Do not season the meat with salt and pepper. This is Asian-style cooking…at least the home-cooking version. Cook the pork until it’s browned or even let it cook until it’s crisp, your preference. Most Chinese restaurants would likely cook the ground pork in a wok over really high heat in lots of oil to fry it. Of course, you can do that too, but be careful not to burn yourself. 

 

The Vegetables and the Sauce 

After about 8 minutes, the pork should have nicely browned and can be removed from the pan. Add another tablespoon of vegetable oil to the same pan and sauté the celery and/or any other vegetable you’re using for about two minutes. Add garlic for another 30 seconds. 

Ground Pork Ramen (Photo by Erich Boenzli)
(Photo by Erich Boenzli)

Remember the pasta water we saved? Add it to the pan and stir in three tablespoons of oyster and soy sauce each. Use a wooden spoon to scrape off the burnt pork bits (the best stuff) from the bottom of the pan. Add the pork back into the pan and then add the noodles. Finally, add some heat like hot sauce, chili paste, sriracha, hot pepper flakes, etc, and mix everything well. 

 

Sprinkle with some chopped cilantro, garnish with lime wedges, and serve. I love to squeeze some lime juice over everything. It gives the dish a light, refreshing touch that mingles nicely with the spiciness and the umami flavor provided by the oyster and soy sauces. 

Ground Pork Ramen (Photo by Erich Boenzli)
(Photo by Erich Boenzli)

Try not to inhale it. We like to use chopsticks to help us slow down, as we are not uber-proficient in using them.

 

The Leftovers

And what about those leftovers? The ingredients listed here are for four servings. So the two of us had leftovers for the next day. The best way to serve? Heat the leftovers in a little oil, using a sauté pan. Whisk up a couple eggs in a bowl and add to the pan. Stir for a couple minutes and you’ve made yourself a delicious breakfast.

Ground Pork Ramen (Photo by Erich Boenzli)
(Photo by Erich Boenzli)

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Ground Pork Ramen (Photo by Erich Boenzli)

Ground Pork Ramen

If ordering out is not an option. No problem. With this easy ground pork ramen recipe, you can satisfy your pork and noodles craving without picking up the phone. 
Prep Time 5 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Total Time 20 mins
Servings 4

Ingredients
  

  • 3 (3-oz packs) ramen (discard seasoning packet)
  • 2 Tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 lb ground pork
  • 4 stalks celery, chopped (or any other firm vegetable you like)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced (about 1 Tbsp)
  • 3 Tbsp oyster sauce
  • 3 Tbsp soy sauce
  • Hot sauce or chili paste to taste
  • 1 c chopped cilantro
  • Lime wedges
  • Egg (optional)

Instructions
 

  • While you’re chopping your veggies and collecting the other ingredients, cook ramen noodles (without using the seasoning packet). Before you drain them, scoop out about half a cup of the water and set aside. This liquid will become part of the sauce. 
  • Drain the noodles and rinse in cold water, so they’ll stop cooking. Cooked ramen should be springy but not spongy. 
  • Heat a tablespoon of vegetable oil over high heat in a sauté pan and brown the ground pork. Use a wooden spoon to break apart any clumps. Do not season the meat with salt and pepper. 
  • Cook the pork until it’s browned or even let it cook until it’s crisp, your preference. 
  • After about 8 minutes, the pork should have nicely browned and can be removed from the pan. 
  • Add another tablespoon of vegetable oil to the same pan and sauté the celery and/or any other vegetable you’re using for about two minutes.
  • Add garlic for another 30 seconds. 
  • Add reserved pasta water to the pan and stir in three tablespoons of oyster and soy sauce each. 
  • Use a wooden spoon to scrape off the burnt pork bits (the best stuff) from the bottom of the pan. 
  • Add the pork back into the pan and then add the noodles.
  • Finally, add some heat like hot sauce, chili paste, sriracha, hot pepper flakes, etc, and mix everything well. 
  • Sprinkle with some chopped cilantro, garnish with lime wedges, and serve. I love to squeeze some lime juice over everything. It gives the dish a light, refreshing touch that mingles nicely with the spiciness and the umami flavor provided by the oyster and soy sauces. 

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